The Beatles: Single By Single

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Bailes, Nov 15, 2019.

  1. Panther

    Panther Forum Resident

    Location:
    Tokyo, Japan
    These are the Beatles' A-sides I personally consider a bit below par (none of them are awful):

    - 'From Me To You' / 'Thank You Girl'
    This one stands out to me as a weaker A-side, an average B-side (which they originally thought was going to be the A-side, I think!), and is kind of a time-filler in an otherwise upward arc they were on from 1962 to 1966. I'm still perplexed as to how 'From Me To You' was as well received as it was in Britain in early '63, but I guess the competition wasn't up to much back then.

    - 'Paperback Writer' / 'Rain'
    - 'Hello, Goodbye' / 'I Am The Walrus'

    These both fall under "great B-side, mediocre A-side" status. I think the band was high on 'Paperback Writer' when it came out in '66 (John spoke highly of it at the time), but in retrospect, after the '66 tour it seems to have been largely forgotten by all of them. 'Hello, Goodbye' I just do not like. It's cheesy, and mildly annoying.


    As strictly A-sides go, I'm not overly fond of 'Can't Buy Me Love', but since I love 'You Can't Do That' (B-side) is fabulous, I still give that one a pass!

    Any particular B-sides I don't like? Yes -- 'I'm Down' is just cheesy; I can never quite accept it. 'Baby, You're A Rich Man' is okay, but seems to get weaker over time (Magical Mystery Tour in general, I think, is mostly crap material). 'You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)' is just a space-filler, but the band itself didn't care anymore by that point.
     
  2. AFOS

    AFOS Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brisbane,Australia
    OT loving the Abbey Road webcam. Keeping an eye out for any groups doing the crossing thing. Seen one thus far but it is a typical London winter
     
  3. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    Yes, Penny Lane and Let It Be were already on ONE because they were number one in the US.

    But they were number TWO in the UK . This is a proposed album called TWO.

    You don't have to buy ONE to own TWO.

    And in any case, ALL these songs are already on other albums.

    Buy TWO today and get ONE free (well, at least these two songs...)
     
  4. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Forum Resident

    Did they have enough #2 singles (US and UK combined, even) to fill an album? They had three in the US ("Do You Want to Know a Secret", "Twist and Shout" and "Yellow Submarine") and two that I know of in Britain ("Please Please Me" and "Penny Lane").
     
  5. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    All the songs I listed were number two in the UK or in the US.

    You probably don't even realise that the Magical Mystey Tour double EPs were number TWO on the SINGLES charts in the UK.

    So all those MMT songs made number two.

    15 songs is quite enough to make up an album.

    Add ONE and ONE is TWO as a bonus track and you'd have a sure-fire hit album.
     
  6. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Love the Ballad! Spent many hours going over the lyrics with friends back in the day. John's pinched, nasally vocal is fun as is Paul's counter vocal. Leave it to the band to turn what could be considered a throw-away into a rollicking rock & roll performance.
     
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  7. Bailes

    Bailes Billy Shears Thread Starter

    Location:
    Australia
    Old Brown Shoe

    [​IMG]
    Single Released: 30 May 1969
    A-side: The Ballad of John and Yoko

    George Harrison began writing "Old Brown Shoe" in late 1968 on a piano, rather than guitar.[3] The song's rhythm suggests the influence of ska.[4] In his 1980 autobiography, I, Me, Mine, Harrison says that the lyrical content started as a study in opposites and reflects "the duality of things – yes-no, up-down, left-right, right-wrong, etc."[2] This idea was also prevalent in the Beatles' 1967 single "Hello, Goodbye",[5][6] which Paul McCartney had written as an exercise in word association[7][8] at a time when the Beatles increasingly embraced randomness as part of the creative process.[9] For Harrison, rather than mere wordplay, the concept of duality appealed on a philosophical level, consistent with his interest in Eastern religion.[3][6] Neil Aspinall, the Beatles' assistant, later recalled Harrison employing the metaphysical theme of opposites to disperse a chapter of Hells Angels[10] who had taken up residence in the Beatles' Apple headquarters over Christmas 1968 and refused to leave.[11][12][nb 1] According to theologian Dale Allison, "Old Brown Shoe" is a further reflection of Harrison's interest in "dualities and contradictions" without the religiosity evident in much of his songwriting.[13]

    Author and critic Ian MacDonald identifies the "hood-eyed spirit" of Bob Dylan in the song's "dusty shuffle-beat" and ironic lyrics, while recognising the "surprising and graphic" chord progression as typical of Harrison's work.[14] Author Alan Clayson also detects a Dylan influence in the rhythm, which he calls a "'Highway 61 Revisited' chug".[15] Clayson cites the "undercurrent of bottleneck" in the song's main guitar riff as anticipating Harrison's slide guitar style, a technique he first embraced in December 1969 while on tour with Delaney & Bonnie and Friends.[16]


    References: Wikipedia
     
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  8. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques "Mr. F!"

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Though not a hit in it’s own right, I consider OPS to be a vital piece of The Beatles canon, sounding like nothing else they ever did. The vocals are somewhat buried but that only emphasizes the superb instrumentation going on. It’s inclusion on the Blue Album has been questioned but I think it fits perfectly and predated the swampy groove they’ll eventually employ with ‘Come Together’.
     
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  9. muddlehead

    muddlehead Forum Resident

    Location:
    santa rosa ca
    Swampy groove

    Fantastic! I'm stealing that! Right now! Used to say CCR and Thorogood et al played Bayou Boogie. Not any more.
     
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  10. BZync

    BZync Senior Member

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I love Old Brown Shoe. George was really on fire in 1968 and 1969. This song has everything going for it. Great melody, good guitar interjections, great arrangement and fantastic bass line. I am not bothered by the fact that George's vocal isn't upfront - it gives the song a bit of mystery. To my ears, this could have been an Abbey Road album track.

    As much as I really do love the big wall of sound on All Things Must Pass, I'm very glad that this particular song was tackled by the Beatles and George Martin. I think Spector might have taken away the urgency of it.
     
  11. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    This song has aged well and become fairly well-known due its presence on the blue album.

    A great B-side, but does anyone remember when British DJ Tony Blackburn played this on his breakfast show on BBC Radio One as an example of how bad the Beatles could be? He wouldn't usually play a B-side on release but went out of his way to do so in this case.

    I think only in their home country could the Beatles be so wrongly criticised in such a flippant, misinformed manner.
     
  12. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    It has some nice guitar work. That's all I got.
     
  13. Glenn coates

    Glenn coates Forum Resident

    Location:
    Usa
    Black Pearl.......terrific song, I’m probably the only person who remembers it.
     
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  14. notesfrom

    notesfrom Forum Resident

    Location:
    NC USA
    Co-written and Produced by...

    Phil Spector.

    Went to #5 in New Zealand.

    I first heard it on the Back To Mono comp.
     
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  15. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Not quite. I bought this single in '69 and love it!
     
  16. On your street , maybe. I remember it well.
     
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  17. BZync

    BZync Senior Member

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Nope. In fact I used to know both Sonny Charles and Sweet Louie (RIP). When last I saw Sonny he was in Steve Miller's band. For years and years the two of them had a regular show in Vegas so I was able to catch up whenever I was in town. But after Louie passed Sonny left Vegas. Very happy he is working with Steve Miller. Sonny is the highlight of his live show, IMO.

    Okay, back to the Beatles.
     
  18. John54

    John54 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    I can't say I like Old Brown Shoe, and (listening to it again) I'd say it probably rivals Get Back for the worst Beatles song on any 45.

    Black Pearl by Sonny Charles and the Checkmates, mentioned above, is an excellent song that I have liked since hearing it in '69 and I was pleasantly surprised to find it on Back to Mono.
     
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  19. Bailes

    Bailes Billy Shears Thread Starter

    Location:
    Australia
    Come Together

    [​IMG]
    A-side: Something (Double-A side)
    Single Released: 6 October 1969

    "Come Together" was inspired by a request from Timothy Leary to write a song for his campaign for governor of California against Ronald Reagan, which promptly ended when Leary was sent to prison for possession of marijuana.
    Beatles historian Jonathan Gould has suggested that the song has only a single "pariah-like protagonist" and Lennon was "painting another sardonic self-portrait".'

    References: Wikipedia
     
  20. BZync

    BZync Senior Member

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Come Together is a song I rarely seek out but really enjoy it when I hear it. I think it's a better recording than song. Nothing you'd want to pick up an acoustic guitar and strum.
     
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  21. Rfreeman

    Rfreeman Forum Resident

    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    Beat example of this in Beatles catalog is And Your Bird Can Sing. The 3 guitar and bass arrangement is amazing - in fact it is my favorite recording they made. On one acoustic guitar it is meh.
     
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  22. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident


    No, no and no. Come Together was the B-side to Something.

    It's a common misconception to think it was a double A-side because Billboard put both songs at number one for one week. But they did this because both songs were receiving enormous radio play in the US.

    In the UK the single Something got to number 4 on the Record Retailer chart (the chart used by the compilation ONE).It made number 4 also on the Melody Maker chart and number 5 on the New Musical Express chart. Come Together didn't chart because B-sides didn't chart in the UK.

    Wikipedia is basing its information on the 'official' charts who put these two songs erroneously at number one in the UK, probably influenced by the US situation.
     
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  23. Bailes

    Bailes Billy Shears Thread Starter

    Location:
    Australia
    Something

    [​IMG]
    A-side: Come Together (Double A-side)
    Single Released: 6 October 1969

    George Harrison began writing "Something" in September 1968, during a session for the Beatles' self-titled double album, also known as "the White Album".[3] In his autobiography, I, Me Mine, he recalls working on the melody on a piano, at the same time as Paul McCartney recorded overdubs in a neighbouring studio at London's Abbey Road Studios.[4] Harrison suspended work on the song,[5] believing that with the tune having come to him so easily, it might have been a melody from another song.[6] In I, Me, Mine, he wrote that the middle eight "took some time to sort out".[4]

    The opening lyric was taken from the title of "Something in the Way She Moves", a track by Harrison's fellow Apple Records artist James Taylor.[7][8] While Harrison imagined the composition in the style of Ray Charles,[9] his inspiration for "Something" was his wife, Pattie Boyd.[10][11] In her 2007 autobiography, Wonderful Today, Boyd recalls: "He told me, in a matter-of-fact way, that he had written it for me. I thought it was beautiful ..." Boyd discusses the song's popularity among other recording artists and concludes: "My favourite [version] was the one by George Harrison, which he played to me in the kitchen at Kinfauns."[12]

    Having begun to write love songs that were directed at both God and a woman, with his White Album track "Long, Long, Long",[13] Harrison later cited alternative sources for his inspiration for "Something".[14] In early 1969, according to author Joshua Greene, Harrison told his friends from the Hare Krishna Movement that the song was about the Hindu deity Krishna;[15] in an interview with Rolling Stone in 1976, he said of his approach to writing love songs: "all love is part of a universal love. When you love a woman, it's the God in her that you see."[16] By 1996, Harrison had denied writing "Something" for Boyd.[8] That year, he told music journalist Paul Cashmere that "everybody presumed I wrote it about Pattie" because of the promotional film accompanying the release of the Beatles' recording, which showed the couple together.[17][18]


    References: Wikipedia
     
  24. Doctor Mu

    Doctor Mu Forum Resident

    Location:
    Texas
    Not a Beatles single, but should have been!!

     
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  25. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    No, No, No, No and No.

    This was NOT a double A-side for reasons already given. Something was THE A-side.

    John gave George a bona fide A-side on a Beatles single. The only one he ever had. It's unacceptable to cheapen the gesture.

    And it's time to stop dumbing-down by repeating internet absurdities.
     
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