The Beatles: Single By Single

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by Bailes, Nov 15, 2019.

  1. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I never heard "Strawberry Fields Forever" until 1981. I prefer the original 1967 stereo mix which has not been issued digitally to my knowledge. Today, all we get is the mono mix and the 1973 stereo remix. Why?

    I barely remember "Penny Lane" from 1967.
     
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  2. TDSOTM

    TDSOTM Forum Resident

    I see Paperback Writer and Rain as being in the same league as Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out. I don't think either of them could've been included on Revolver (the bar was set too high for that album). Production wise the only new thing I hear is the backwards stuff at the end of Rain, even though I like both Paperback Writer and Rain a lot. Basically, if we're treating these songs as being in the transitional period between Rubber Soul and Revolver, I'd say that period began a few months earlier with Day Tripper and We Can Work It Out.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
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  3. BZync

    BZync Senior Member

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I suppose it was pretty easy to answer the question "what does a Beatles single sound like?" From She Loves You to Paperback Writer there was a logical progression. It was rock music but it got a little more polished, a little more sophisticated with each release. But each single was points on a line of pop/rock.

    But now what does a Beatles single sound like? Hmmm. Eleanor Rigby? Yellow Submarine? What on earth is going on?

    With the benefit of 50 years of familiarity, it's easy to forget how radically different these songs were from previous Beatles singles and most everything else on the charts. In 1966, more than any year before, the Beatles were charting their own course. No sign of Chuck Berry here.

    How difficult is it to create truly original and unique pop song? The Beatles did it twice in the same release - and they were album tracks to boot.
     
  4. BZync

    BZync Senior Member

    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Strawberry Fields Forever.

    To my ears, it still sounds like nothing before or since. John did about six psychedelic songs during 1966 & 1967. This is the best of the bunch. Others may have been, arguably, more charming, more radical, more bizarre. But none more affecting.

    As demo tapes have shown, strip away the production and arrangement and you are left with a lovely ballad. One of John's best songs.
     
  5. Manapua

    Manapua Forum Resident

    Location:
    Honolulu
    Strawberry Fields Forever

    Simply the best single they ever released and there's some killer competition on that front. The woozy, dream-like quality of the production was unlike anything else hitting the upper reaches of the chart and again demonstrated the group was still leading the way in the world of Pop/Rock. Meanwhile in their homeland, one singer with the unwieldy moniker Engelbert Humperdinck took Release Me, a song written in the late 40s, to the top for six weeks, preventing PN/SFF from attaining #1 status there.
     
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  6. Hermes

    Hermes Past Master

    Location:
    Denmark
    Please explain this to a dumb dane!
     
  7. zipp

    zipp Forum Resident

    Strawberry Fields Forever

    A very courageous move to put this out as one of the A-sides on this single. A fantastic song and arrangement, but was it wise to put it on the single?

    To be honest I think the only other available track was When I'm 64 which would have weakened the single to some extent. But maybe Penny Lane would have got more airplay with a weaker song on a B-side.

    If SFF had been released in 1970 Billboard would have considered it good enough to put it at number one along with Penny Lane, but in 1967 it was not to be.

    So SFF still has the dubious privilege of being the best Beatle song not to make number one.
     
  8. Bruce M.

    Bruce M. Forum Resident

    Arguably the greatest double A side single in the history of popular music. Two songs looking back at youthful memories, complementary but utterly different, each fascinating and brilliant in its own way. When John and Paul nailed it, they nailed it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  9. Floatupstream

    Floatupstream Forum Resident

    Location:
    Missouri,usa
    I remember hearing this when it came out in 1967 and as an 8 year old it scared me, but I couldn’t help but listen to it over and over. I think it was the tag at the end of SFF and also cymbal feedback thing at the end of PL. This wasn’t the lovable mop tops anymore. These two songs still mesmerize me 50 years on.
     
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  10. Brodnation

    Brodnation The Future Never Dies because Tomorrow Never Knows

    Location:
    Canada
    I was basically trying to say if you split the Beatles into 4 eras

    Mop-Top
    Transition
    “Tea” era
    Late period

    and have one single that presents that era the best. For the “Tea” era I would chose SFF/PL

    (sorry for my poor grammar)

    (Tea is a slag term for drugs used in The Rutles movie)
     
  11. dsdu

    dsdu Forum Resident

    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Prellie
    Tea (pot)
    Acid
    Hard Drugs
     
  12. Fischman

    Fischman RockMonster, ClassicalMaster, and JazzMeister

    Location:
    New Mexico
    Strawberry Fields Forever

    (Writing the minority opinion)

    Mindless hippie escapism. One of the most overrated songs not just in the Beatles canon, but of all time.

    But it does have an interesting chord progression.
     
  13. dsdu

    dsdu Forum Resident

    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
    I remember on Sunday night February 12, 1967 we all got in a car and drove to a friend's house in Hollywood to watch the SFF and PL videos on Ed Sullivan because he was the only one of us who had a color tv.
     
  14. dsdu

    dsdu Forum Resident

    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
  15. Bailes

    Bailes Billy Shears Thread Starter

    Location:
    Australia
    Penny Lane

    [​IMG]
    A-side: Strawberry Fields Forever (Double A-side)
    Single Released: 13 February 1967

    Penny Lane is a road in the south Liverpool suburb of Mossley Hill. The name also applies to the area surrounding its junction with Smithdown Road and Allerton Road, and to the roundabout at Smithdown Place that was the location for a major bus terminus, originally an important tram junction of Liverpool Corporation Tramways. The roundabout was a common stopping place for John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison during their years as school children and students. Bus journeys via Penny Lane and the area itself subsequently became familiar elements in the early years of the Lennon–McCartney songwriting partnership.

    Lennon's original lyrics for "In My Life" had included a reference to Penny Lane.[10] Soon after the Beatles recorded "In My Life" in October 1965, McCartney mentioned to an interviewer that he wanted to write a song about Penny Lane. A year later, he was spurred to write the song once presented with Lennon's "Strawberry Fields Forever".[11][12] McCartney also cited Dylan Thomas's nostalgic poem "Fern Hill" as an inspiration for "Penny Lane".[13] Lennon co-wrote the lyrics with McCartney.[14][15] He recalled in a 1970 interview: "The bank was there, and that was where the trams sheds were and people waiting and the inspector stood there, the fire engines were down there. It was reliving childhood."[14]

    Writing for the song took place early in the sessions for what became the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album,[16] which commenced following a three-month period when the Beatles had pursued individual interests.[17] Beatles biographer Ian MacDonald suggested an LSD influence, saying that the lyrical imagery points to McCartney first taking LSD in late 1966. MacDonald concluded that the lyric "And though she feels as if she's in a play / She is anyway" was one of the more "LSD-redolent phrases" in the Beatles' catalogue.[18] Music critics Roy Carr and Tony Tyler similarly described the subject matter as "essentially 'Liverpool-on-a-sunny-hallucinogenic-afternoon'".[19]

    References: Wikipedia
     
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  16. AFOS

    AFOS Forum Resident

    Location:
    Brisbane,Australia
    Yeah they were taking different kinds of drugs from beginning to end. Until now had never heard the term "tea" as term for pot but makes sense

    If I had to name one song by Paul it would be "Penny Lane". A wonderful sunny depiction of Paul and John's childhood memories seen through a slightly lysergic lens. Also contains one of my favourite Paul lyrics (or John's) "...there beneath the blue suburban skies"
     
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  17. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
    Rubber Soul & Revolver are 2 Favorites. However Yellow Submarine sticks out like a sure thumb to me. Ok I gotta go back to the beginning of this thread. PaxAmoLux, Iam
     
  18. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
    Ringo is why I took to drums. I was 9 when we piled into the station wagon and my sister and I seen Hard Days Night. Ringo stood out to me and I became a drummer. I prefer Ringo too that's to say. Took the long way huh?
     
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  19. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
    Such Harmonies.....Heaven
     
  20. dsdu

    dsdu Forum Resident

    Location:
    Santa Cruz, CA
  21. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
    Agreed %100
     
  22. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
     
  23. William Smart

    William Smart 21st Century Schizoid Man

    Location:
    North Haven, CT
    Definitely. Love Me Do is A ParTay. It grabs you from the start. That Harmonica, gritty, nasty. This ain't no cutesy doo whop ( which I love) it's New, It's Dangerous, parents don't like this. Gotta Dance, Gotta Shout. But familiar enough to get even the Collegians on their feet.... It was GREAT. Still love it
     
  24. Steve Carras

    Steve Carras Forum Resident

    Location:
    Whittier,CA USA

    I was 3. I listening..;0
     
  25. Steve Carras

    Steve Carras Forum Resident

    Location:
    Whittier,CA USA
    You meant "P.S. I Love You", didn't you?
     

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