My NOS/NIB FM Aerial Antenna was delivered ToDay! *

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by coolhandjjl, Sep 26, 2020.

  1. Hagstrom

    Hagstrom Forum Resident

    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    WMMR has been terrible for years. I listen to Bailey on Sirius now.
     
  2. Charlie-2

    Charlie-2 Active Member

    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    WMMR has been terrible for years. I listen to Bailey on Sirius now.



    Depending on exactly where your at, you might try 91,3 for the U of D station, WVUD. It has different types of music at different times like most college stations. Point your 'tenna the right direction you might pick it up.
     
  3. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed Three chords and an attitude

    Location:
    Colorado foothills
    College radio has always been fun for the adventurous. Because they're not driven by commercial concerns (or a PD looking for ratings), mostly they play whatever the on-air personality feels like. Years ago, Towson State's radio station in Baltimore was always good for a listen because you never knew what was coming next, instead of the limited playlists on commercial pop stations.

    These days in Denver, I mostly listen to KVOD/88.1 for non-commercial classical, or KUVO/89.3 non-commercial jazz. Both stream, so you can hear them anywhere on the 'net.
     
  4. coolhandjjl

    coolhandjjl Embiggened Pompatus Thread Starter

    Location:
    Appleton
    [​IMG]

    As promised!
     
    elvisizer and TheVinylAddict like this.
  5. Charlie-2

    Charlie-2 Active Member

    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Wow, I hadn't realized it was That Big!! I get good reception with a smaller one in my attic. Maybe I should try that one and do some long distance searching.
     
  6. coolhandjjl

    coolhandjjl Embiggened Pompatus Thread Starter

    Location:
    Appleton
    Almost a 12’ boom, 6’ longest element. Needs approx a 7’ radius to fully rotate. All I need to do is point the narrow end NE as both my favorite stations rent towers on the same hill
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2020
  7. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict ___The Enforcer___

    It is a beast and they don't make them like they used to.... I used to love the Winegard 6065 too.

    I am getting ready to compromise and just put the cheap Winegard 6061 or the FM2500HD on my 10 ft mast that is currently my HDTV antenna. Double stack, home made :).... I already have a 6061 on the other side of my house / peak for the carport and kitchen tuner... solo. It's OK for short range, in city pickup, no problems with it.

    The FM2500HD is actually the top portion of the HD Stacker.... which is a dual FM / HDTV stack. Denny (from Dennys antenna) separated it from the stack, and started selling it as a standalone FM antenna. He did a measurement comparison of the FM2500HD and Winegard 6065, and although of course the 6065 came out on top, the 2500HD did quite well. Long Range FM 2500HD FM antenna In Stock

    Probably a little overpriced at $100, but these days it is the only game in town for anything substantial, other than just using a decent HDTV antenna for FM that has a good lo-VHF band signal.... (88-108mhz pick up).
     
  8. coolhandjjl

    coolhandjjl Embiggened Pompatus Thread Starter

    Location:
    Appleton
    Got about a 35’ run. RG59 adequate?
     
  9. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict ___The Enforcer___

    Sure, but why not use RG-6?? :) That baby deserves the best it can get!

    Did it come with a balun?
     
    tumbleweed likes this.
  10. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed Three chords and an attitude

    Location:
    Colorado foothills
  11. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict ___The Enforcer___

    I always use RG6 personally, but the link is correct... RG59 is good for antenna for shorter runs.

    After 50 ft, amplifier or not, I would go RG6. OP - it's your call, but RG59 is adequate for that run.

    I scored two large spools of RG6 at Goodwill for some insane price of like $6.99 a year or two ago, so cost is not an option and I use RG6 for everything.
     
  12. csgreene

    csgreene Forum Resident

    Location:
    Idaho, USA
    Living where I do, I get my FM stations via internet, most of them far, far from Idaho. No antenna required (although we still have a mast-mounted OTA antenna for TV).
     
  13. coolhandjjl

    coolhandjjl Embiggened Pompatus Thread Starter

    Location:
    Appleton
    Balun, yup.

    Then there’s RG6 Quad! I’ll get RG6 if it’s a good price. Will a regular wire-stripper/crimper work, or do I need a dedicated tool?
     
  14. tumbleweed

    tumbleweed Three chords and an attitude

    Location:
    Colorado foothills
  15. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict ___The Enforcer___

    Well, you can do the whole thing with a pair of nippers and a utility knife.... there are many methods to strip an end correctly, all the way down to a utility knife!! Then, you can choose between compression ends or the crimp style ends. I've been through the manual --> crimp style ---> compression path over the years, and these days stick with a compression tool, compression fittings and a cutter dedicated to coaxial instead of those all in ones that you adjust the blade and take 10 cuts to dial it in when you change wire size! :)

    But these days I use a Jokari ($30) for quick double ended stripping of both cuts, and a Klein compression tool ($15 - $20). Then, I only use compression ends. (Klein, Belden, etc).

    This is after progressing through manual, to cutters that work marginally well, to where I am now.

    For a $50 to $60 investment, you can have a toolset that will last a lifetime and make good, compressed connections. But I understand if you only make one cut every couple of years, hard to justify. Some people I know buy, use and return! :) (I didn't say that). But everything you see on the internet can be done with a utility knife, nippers and careful pressure / cutting.
     
    coolhandjjl likes this.
  16. TheVinylAddict

    TheVinylAddict ___The Enforcer___

    Coolhand - realize the tools I recommend above are not professional grade, those doing it hundreds of times a day or week would opt for more, but it is something a homeowner won't wear out any time soon, even with having an occasional bubble of 10-20 connections for a certain job. $50-$60 bucks in my humble opinion is about the cut off where you start spending less for tools that do both the stripping, and the compression or crimp, you kinda get what you pay for. It gets you in compression fitting range with quality, homeowner / consumer grade.
     
  17. reb

    reb Money Beats Soul

    Location:
    Long Island
    Run a separate ground line to protect when lightning strikes.

    ask me how I know...:shake:
     
  18. coolhandjjl

    coolhandjjl Embiggened Pompatus Thread Starter

    Location:
    Appleton
    It will be in my attic
     

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