EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    True. But one review was nothing but a moral judgment about Michael saying its impossible to ever enjoy his work again, and later reviews are glowing about how fantastic his music was without a single snide mark about later accusations and allegations to where I really did assume Stereogum had assigned a different writer to cover his later hits because the Ben review felt like nothing but a hit piece on him after the controversy surrounding Leaving Neverland
     
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  2. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Thank you for bringing up 'Sail On Sailor'. Should have been a much bigger hit. I would also throw in 1973's 'Dancing in The Moonlight' from King Harvest and probably the earliest example of proto-Yacht Rock would be 'Ride Captain Ride' from Blues Image in 1970
     
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  3. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Oh there's a couple of good early ones, yeah. Every now and again I'll encounter a song from '71 - '73 and think, "Hmmm, kinda proto-Yacht Rock..."

    "Ride Captain Ride" is great of course because like "Sail On, Sailor" and "Brandy" it has the nautical theme in the lyrics. Quite a few Yacht Rock tunes literally features boats, the ocean, beaches, sailing, etc. It definitely seemed to be targeting a specific audience, and is probably how this broader subset of "light rock" ended up acquiring the name.
     
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  4. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    Why does "Ben" bother so many people? It's just a little song about friendship by a 12 or 13-year old singer. If the fact that it's a song about a pet rat, pretend it's a song to a human named Ben. FWIW, I was about the same age as MJ when that song came out. I liked it then, and I like it now.

    Yes. But, none of those guys you mentioned are convicted serial rapists like Bill Cosby is, either.
    People love songs about being free in the open. Just the suggestion of freedom makes people happy.
     
  5. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    Good point I agree with. I guess I’m lucky as I can completely separate art from the person. As a country we really hold celebrities way too high imo. What they do in their personal life, for me, doesn’t diminish the quality of their music but I am sympathetic to those that feel they can no longer support an artist if certain lines are crossed. With Jackson, I just can’t decide if he was guilty or not based on what I thought was pretty thin evidence, and given that, I can’t toss his incredible catalog of music aside. I didn’t see the show about him that was on HBO since I don’t get it.
     
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  6. Jrr

    Jrr Forum Resident

    I’m glad Cosby didn’t sing. I guess you have a point...what he did makes it more difficult to just dismiss.
     
  7. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    I don't hold these celebs high. They are people just like you and me. They just happened to get lucky in the right place at the right time. Many of them are still the same dirtbags they were before they got famous. I thought of Paul McCartney, and how he was a real dikk to people while he was married to Haley whats-her-face. Well, we know now how miserable he was with her, and he projected it onto others. Famous people go through hard times too. I'm still trying to decide if I should excuse Kanye West because of his mental illness, and won't take his meds. We can rag on his wife Kim Kardashian for whatever reasons, but she must go through a lot of hell with and for him, and especially since they have a kid or two together. Will their kids genetically inherit his disposition to mental illness?

    I just know that whenever I see these people with their problems, I am just happy that i'm not them. Proof that money can't solve everything...but i'd love to find that out for myself. :)
     
  8. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    Prince was a genius at using drum machines and synthesizers to their full potential in his music. Nevertheless it was nice to hear a a Prince hit dominated by live instrumentation.

    The definitive version. The versions recorded by Prince as well as the Pointer Sisters are nice but there is something special about Chaka Khan's recording that made it so memorable. For me, it's the combination of Mel Melle's rap, Stevie Wonder's harmonica breaks, and Chaka's sultry vocal over a pulsating dance groove. All of these elements just fall into place at the right time.

    This is probably my favorite single from Private Dancer. It was soulful, sophisticated, and it rocked.

    This was a reinvention that caught me off guard. Her early stuff might have been light but it suited her voice perfectly. "Strut", on the other hand, sounded forced when I first heard it. The song soon grew on me and I realize now that the shift toward a more r&b oriented sound helped to extend her stay on the pop charts.

    I was never a Cyndi Lauper fan but "All Through The Night" has a chorus that sticks in your head.

    To think that this was once the guy the guy who brought da funk on those great early Commodores hits such as "Fancy Dancer" and "Slippery When Wet".

    It's a cut or two below the Let's Dance hits but it's solid nonetheless.

    It's pleasant but it doesn't hold my interest. This is basically a rewrite of "Don't Let It End" in feel and arrangement.

    I hear ya . This song never clicked with me even when it was popular.

    One of McCartney's best 80s hits. David Gilmour's guitar solo is tasteful and really helps to take things to a new level.

    I had to Google this one. Kenny Rogers's delivery is quite soulful here but this the song itself just doesn't grab me.

    Next.

    A noble sentiment but man, this song is terrible.

    I loved it too. I had been a Zeppelin fan for about two years when this came out and too be honest, it didn't sound all that far removed "All Of My Love" or "Rain Song".

    This was probably the worst of their big hits. Simon Lebon sounds uncomfortable during the chorus as he reaches for notes that were almost beyound his range and that "WILD BOYS!" at the beginning was irritating.

    I remember when this came out. This was the first hit single with their new signer (who sounded almost identical to his predecessor). As for the song itself, I like it. It might not be cutting edge but it has some decent hooks.

    It's all right. I found that they leaned a little too heavily on the Springsteen influence and that might have helped shorten the band's career in the long run.

    We had a head start on you guys with this one. "It Ain't Enough" had been a major hit in Canada during the Summer of 1984 (roughly around the time "Sunglasses At Night" broke in the U.S.). I was never a big Corey Hart fan but I've always had a soft spot for this song. The production and instrumentation are impeccable and really bring out the the best in a well crafted pop song.

    I know what you are saying. Compared to some of the brand new entries on this chart, "Walking On a Thin Line" was already showing its age which is surprising considering that Sports had only been out for a year. Regardless, it's actually my favorite single from Sports.


    I'm not a fan of kids' choirs on pop songs but this is a rare instance where it worked quite well. To be fair the kids' voice are rather low in the mix.

    I agree. "Some Guys Have All The Luck" showed that Stewart (already a 20 year veteran at this point) could successfully adapt to fit the pop music landscape of the era and remain relevant (at least for the time being).

    It's an okay song but it doesn't give one a good indication of his next career move and how successful it would be.

    It only reached #26 on the RPM Charts but I do remember it getting a lot of top 40 airplay at the time.

    Although Julian's lineage gave him a leg up in the industry, "Valotte"was a beautiful song and its success was well deserved.

    Up here, "Lucky Star" was still getting some decent airplay when "Like A Virgin" dropped in early November. For a couple of weeks, both songs were in the top 40 in my area.

    A great song tainted by over the top production.

    I agree with you 100% on the production. And Jermaine's voice blends in perfectly. This is another big hit from that era that you barely hear anymore.

    I agree and I am saying this as someone who is a fan of his Styx songs.

    "I Can Dream About You" was one of those ''lightning in a bottle" singles that still hold up well today. "We Are The Young" has 1984 timestamped all over it.

    It's been a while since I heard this one. I tend to be dismissive of Elton's 80s period but "Who Wears These Shoes" is well constructed pop single with great hooks.

    I turned this off about 40 seconds in. Never heard this before today and I never want to hear it again.

    I like this one. It's a little closer to their earlier, harder-rocking hits such as "Roll With The Changes" and "Ridin' The Storm Out". It does sound like it came straight out of 1981 or '82 and I'm guessing that might have something to do with relatively low chart placement.

    Another minor hit that I believe should have have been much bigger. It's a shame that it's currently unavailable even on streaming platforms.

    Haven't heard this one since it was on the charts. I like the pre-chorus but that's about it.



    "New Year's Day" had garnered some top 40 airplay in Canada the year before so I was aware of U2 when Pride (In The Name Of Love) hit. This was the song that had me convinced that U2 had could be around for a while.[/QUOTE][/QUOTE]
     
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  9. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    Out of Touch - Th production is cold and mechanical yet it fits the song perfectly. Although I prefer their earlier hits, I do admire Hall and Oates uncanny ability to keep up with the times without completely abandoning their roots. It would serve them well for most of the 8os.

     
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  10. SomeCallMeTim

    SomeCallMeTim Forum Resident

    Location:
    Rockville, CT
    A very belated best wishes to @pablo fanques in his new endeavor. I always wanted to be a DJ - glad you have the chance!
     
  11. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Cyndi's All Through The Night may be my favorite hit of 1984. It's incredibly beautiful.
     
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  12. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    Not even the best Lauper single from that year! ;)
     
  13. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Thank you. It’s just a one hour show 6pm EST Sundays to start and I’m doing it with my brother, who also has been out of radio for over 15 years. If anyone cares to tune in, it can be found at z93hv.com or Z93 on the iheart radio app on your phone or tablet. My real name is Mike Colvin and the show is called “The Colvin Brothers”
     
  14. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Out of Touch

    I'm tempted to do some sort of 'Hall and Oates were out of touch' joke, but I'm too lazy to come up with one, so you'll get spared THIS TIME. :D

    As I've said, I'm not much of a fan of these guys. Although I don't actively dislike this one like I do Private Eyes or Kiss On My List, it's another in a long line of meh numbers from them. I won't miss them now that their run is over.

    I recall having a talk with a guy in my freshman dorm at this time. Walking by his room, I heard him listening to Let It Be (the album) and dropped in. He told me that he had just discovered the Beatles and really loved them (late to the party, but welcome!). He had been a big fan of Hall & Oates, but, he added, 'then I grew up'. I always remember that conversation when I think about Out of Touch, which was a hit at the time.

    I don't think you 'grow out of' Hall & Oates, but I do think that the times were about ready to pass them by.
     
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  15. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    In late November, Midge Ure of Ultravox and Bob Geldof of the Boomtown Rats decided to record a charity record to benefit the victims of the Ethiopian famine. Geldof started calling friends up to participate, and before he knew it, he had commitments from a who's-who of top stars of the time, including Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran, Phil Collins, Boy George, Bono, George Michael and his hairdo, and Sting.

    The song they came up with was a holiday-themed record called 'Do They Know It's Christmas?' It was released in early December and smashed records for sales in the UK. It went to number 1 for five weeks there and ended up beating Paul McCartney's Mull of Kintyre as the biggest selling single in British history. The song reached 13 on the Billboard chart.

    And of course, it also inspired a similar effort a few months later by US stars, which in turn would lead to the biggest charity concert in history... But that's getting ahead of ourselves!



    Geldof later had a blunt assessment of this effort, telling the press in 2010: 'I am responsible for two of the worst songs in history. The other one is 'We Are the World''. Ure was more balanced, saying that the song itself didn't matter, it was just a mechanism for earning money to help a cause.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
  16. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Total sausagefest. Looks like someone finally realized it toward the end and drug in Banarama and Jody Watley, who was a virtual nobody at the time.

    Bono's biggest exposure yet in the US. I'd forgotten all about that.

    The era of the charity single had begun... Well, I guess ABBA had kind of kicked that off back in the '70s, but now it was getting turned up to 11.
     
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  17. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    the irony is that apparently when Band Aid was on Top Of The Pops that year, Bono was the one artist not invited because U2 weren't "big enough hitmakers" at the time... when 20 years later they'd be the only one of the lot of them still scoring hits. Casey Kasem also famously had a meltdown about "who gives a (bleep)" on American Top 40 when reading off their names and bio, I guess seeing they had a member named The Edge sent him off lol. And again, outside of Madonna and maybe one or two others, they're the only acts in the top 40 in late 1984 who'd still be in the top 40 20 years later.
     
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  18. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    Also very white for a charity record about Africa. I remember reading that Kool and the Gang participated, because they happened to be in the studio at the time. The American version was much more Afro representative.

    As for charity singles, don't forget that George Harrison wrote and released a song for the Concert for Bangladesh called 'Bangla Desh'. I'd say that was the first one of these.

     
  19. AppleBonker

    AppleBonker Forum Resident

    Location:
    Seattle
    One of the most interesting aspects of these All Star records is the obvious caste system at play in their production. Geldof and Ure wrote the song, and they don't even get any lines to sing. Only the Big Names get a solo spotlight. In the video, the lesser-knowns are lucky to get panned past in a crowd shot. It was even more bald-faced during We are the World, but we'll get to that later ('We checked our egos at the door' they claimed... yeah, sure ya did).
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
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  20. boyjohn

    boyjohn Forum Resident

    Well, Geldof (to his credit), knew that the big names would raise the most money. Although things didn't always work out as planned, the guy really wanted to make the world a better place. If only we could get countries as a whole to be more like that.
     
  21. bare trees

    bare trees Forum Resident

    We tend to forget that U2 sounded nothing like what was on American radio when "Pride" hit the top 40. I can easily understand why Casey Kasem (who was in his early 50s by this time and really wasn't as tuned into the youth market as his public persona would lead you to believe) might be put off by an upstart band featuring guys with seemingly ridiculous names such as Bono or The Edge.
     
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  22. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I think being out of step with 1984 top 40 was one of the things that worked in their favor to a degree. Completely opposite of the Duran Duran, Madonna, Cyndi Lauper, Wham, etc... was a burgeoning alternative rock scene with REM, The Smiths, Echo And The Bunnymen, New Order, The Cure, Husker Du, etc....., U2 were the first one that was able to bridge between the two worlds and then a couple years later so would REM and a handful of others would also start being able to make that crossover. Granted, a lot of people today might not think of U2 in that world because they became such a stadium band (and then they started moving into the dreaded "dad rock" territory come 2000), but they were constant "Alternative" chart presences through Pop and they had enough "cred" in that world to maintain their superstardom in the 90s when many of their other chart peers found themselves in yesterday's news.
     
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  23. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Oh I heard the album when I was a kid, during my crazed Beatles phase. I feel like that was a slightly different beast, since it was both a concert and and album, but it definitely seems to have originated the whole concept. It's just "Christmas" ushered in the era of the mega charity single. And we'd soon get the offspring of Bangladesh and "Christmas" in the summer of '85...
     
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  24. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    While we're still on "Out Of Touch". This isn't the only late 1984 hit single Daryl Hall is responsible for, he'd also pen, co-produce and sing backup on this top 20 hit for Diana Ross

     
  25. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I loved Diana but I barely remember this one from the time. The video is unintentionally hilarious. The song is '80s cheeze.
     
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