EVERY Billboard #1 hit discussion thread 1958-Present

Discussion in 'Music Corner' started by alphanguy, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    We spent almost a week on Wake Me Up Before You GoGo! Lmao
     
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  2. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Out of Touch is my 3rd favorite Hall & Oates #1 after Private Eyes and I Can't Go For That. Out of Touch is also my 3rd favorite #1 hit of 1984 after Time After Time and What's Love Got To Do With It.
     
  3. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Darryl has always been respected within the industry and even more so since the opening of "Darryl's House" in Pawling, NY. I've seen many shows there over the years and for a while there was a corresponding TV show. I will also say that the Hall & Oates tours since their hitmaking period are top notch and free of the excessive 80's noise. Highly recommended
     
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  4. Hey Vinyl Man

    Hey Vinyl Man Another bloody Yank down under...

    I remember the '88 comeback and really wanting to like their new stuff. But it just wasn't very good, and it was even further into '80s production excess than "Out of Touch" was.
     
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  5. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Yeah, there are hints of then-contemporary hip hop beats and such on it, but it's sort blasted like spray paint all over the record, which is still click-clacky mechanical '80s long after that sound's sell-by date.

    Some organic textures actually appear again in their work on their 1990 effort Change Of Season, although they don't seem to be able to fully commit to a less-manufactured sound across the record and there are still all sorts of by then hopelessly dated '80s affectations strewn all over the album. Lead single "So Close" sounds like it arrived from a mid-'80s timewarp in the universe's most-annoying TARDIS. Cuts like "Change Of Season" highlight a direction the whole record probably should have taken.
     
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  6. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    My favorite H&O singles up to this point in no particular order:

    Sara Smile
    She's Gone (original single edit)
    Do What You Want, Be What You Are
    Rich Girl
    Kiss On My List
    I Can't Go For That (No Can Do) (both single mixes)
    Family Man
    Say It Isn't So
    Adult Education (album mix)
    Out Of Touch
     
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  7. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Largely in agreement with you here but for me, it’s the LP version of ‘’She’s Gone” or BUST! What can I say? I like my 70’s jams looong
     
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  8. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Fave H&O singles, from worst to first

    One On One - Nice, somewhat moody piece from the duo.
    Did It In A Minute - Nifty New Wave tune.
    Out Of Touch - The '80s excesses were starting to take over, but this one is still an earworm in spite of that
    Private Eyes - This one really helped establish them as '80s superstars and proved the preceding album Voices wasn't just some fluke.
    Say It Isn't So - Another kinda moody number. Love the echo-y quality of it. Lots of space, unlike the sonic wall on some of their later work.
    Kiss On My List - The song that launched their Imperial Period. Another early '80s shrink wrapped pop classic.
    She's Gone - Amazing that a song from '73 could sound so contemporary in '76. Yet it's also fairly timeless. They really wrote a soulful classic here.
    You Make My Dreams - Love the herky-jerk, stop-start quality of this one - very unique.
    Maneater - Wonderful pop tune, again great sense of space. A highlight of a fairly dismal year on the pop charts, which were pretty dire below the top spot (which "Maneater" deservedly reached).
    Rich Girl - Classic pop tune, again another soulful classic that feels like it's existed forever.
    Sara Smile - I clearly love these guys the most when they get moody and soulful, and this one does both. Hall's singing on this one is peerless. Their first Top 10 hit - it deserved to go to #1.
    I Can't Go For That (No Can Do) - One of the great hits of the '80s and certainly a highlight of the fairly dismal 1981. I absolutely freaked out for this one as a kid, and love it just as much today. The song that inspired at least 3 additional #1 hits...one of which we just covered recently in this thread, another which we'll be discussing within a couple of days...

    H&O are unfairly overlooked and somewhat maligned today, but they really cracked the code to chart success the first half of the '80s and definitely set a standard a slew of other acts followed. I'd say they're right up there with Kim Carnes, ONJ, Blondie, The Human League, The Police, Culture Club, Cyndi Lauper, John Cougar-Mellencamp and Michael Jackson when it comes to chart topping acts from '80 - '84 who had a major influence on the sound of the era's big hits. But we're rapidly transitioning to another era now, and three acts new to the top of the charts in '84 would be major defining influences over the sound of the next chunk of the '80s.
     
  9. Grant

    Grant Senior Member

    Location:
    United States
    Oooooh! I forgot about that one! But, that's OK. I'm still sick of hearing it.
     
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  10. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    Right. The songs at least were there for Big Bam Boom despite the production, the tracks off Ooh Yeah were largely very weak and it certainly failed to live up to expectations.
     
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  11. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I think differently about how they're viewed. 15-20 years ago maybe but much like ABBA, H&O had a major hipster revaluation in the late 00s/early 10s and started to become cool again. Alt rock group The Bird And The Bee recorded a well received tribute album to them, the movie 500 Days Of Summer helped revive You Make My Dreams (now their biggest streaming hit) and Live From Daryl's House also helped make people look at them in a different way
     
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  12. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I like the slowing down because its helped Stereogum catch up. They used to be years behind, now they're in 1984 (the beginning as they just covered Owner Of A Lonely Heart, but still) and might finally catch up to us by some point in 85 or 86
     
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  13. The Slug Man

    The Slug Man Forum Resident

    Location:
    North Carolina
    And at the risk of saying the dreaded Y-word...whether Yacht or not, they are played often on Sirius XM's Yacht Rock channel and tribute acts like the Yacht Rock Revue cover their songs all the time.
     
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  14. W.B.

    W.B. The Collector's Collector

    Location:
    New York, NY, USA
    Thematically, it seemed like a drawn-out variant of what was dealt with in Mel & Tim's 1969 hit "Backfield In Motion" which didn't take quite as long to get to the point.
     
  15. pablo fanques

    pablo fanques Somebody's Bad Handwroter

    Location:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Oh they are very much linked with Yacht Rock to be sure:

     
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  16. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I don't see the H&O/yacht rock connection outside of the era and maybe John Oates' mustache. Of the big 80s hits of theirs, One On One is the only one that Imo comes close to yacht rock leanings, I usually associate it with Michael McDonald and pre-Footloose Kenny Loggins
     
  17. Oatsdad

    Oatsdad Oat, Biscuits and Abbie: Best Dogs Ever

    Location:
    Alexandria VA
    I guess you could argue "Sara Smile" is Yacht Rock-y... maybe.

    But yeah... they were pure pop in the 80s, and not YR...
     
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  18. bartels76

    bartels76 Forum Hall Of Fame

    Location:
    CT
    For me this is the best/ultimate version of OOT. It's the Video version with the Dance On Your Knees intro and also can be found on the Hall & Oates Playlist comp and digitally.
     
  19. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Probably '85
     
  20. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    Um, I think that's true to some degree and was going to mention it actually in my overview of their work, but I think it's kind of a winking "appreciation" still, with more than a touch of irony. I think the people doing it are only vaguely familiar with their '80s work and largely unfamiliar with their pre-1980 hits as well. But I do agree that it could put them on the road to a much broader reappraisal, as happened with ABBA sometime after Erasure really kicked things off with the hilariously-titled Abba-esque album in the early '90s.

    (Eurythmics were way, way ahead of the curve with the ABBA love - 1987's Savage bears more than a passing resemblance sonically to ABBA's work, and that was very much intentional. The market just wasn't really ready for it, unfortunately since it's arguably their finest album.)
     
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  21. sunspot42

    sunspot42 Forum Resident

    Location:
    San Francisco
    I think several of even their '80s hits are more than somewhat tinged with Yacht Rock, including that cover of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'", "One On One" and "Maneater". "Say It Isn't So", too. A lot of their work is Motown-derived, and Yacht Rock definitely had a thing for Motown.

    Their most Yacht Rock-esque work tho was certainly in the '70s, and you could say they helped to frame that genre as well. Their breakthru hit "Sara Smile" certainly sounds like YR to me. The blue eyed soul of "She's Gone" sounds a lot like proto Yacht Rock and predates both "Smile" as well as many other tunes you could peg as origin points for the genre, at least given when it was recorded ('73) if not when it was a hit. About the only songs of a similar vintage in the origin of the genre are "Sail On Sailor" by The Beach Boys ('73, re-released in '75) and "Brandy (You're A Fine Girl)" by Looking Glass ('72).
     
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  22. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I used to dislike their thread when it was in the 70s and you had zoomers writing about music out of their era and element and complaining about how something from 1974 isn't "woke" enough in today's way of thinking (let's not forget the writeup about Michael Jackson's Ben that came right after Leaving Neverland aired that spent more time talking about how "problematic" celebrating the music of MJ is than the song itself... fortunately the person doing the writeup for the Thriller tracks actually seems to remember a time MJ was relevant and alive and is focusing on the music.

    The writeups starting around 1979-1980 on were better since it seems like the people they've hired writing those songs seem to be able to appreciate the music more than the people who were shading 70s AM pop for not fitting in with present day
     
  23. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    I think it's the same guy writing everyone. It's his series.
     
  24. Jmac1979

    Jmac1979 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    Weird. Ben was all about how we need to cancel MJ the way we got rid of Cosby with essentially no review about the actual song yet the Billie Jean and Beat It reviews were about them being timeless classics and how Michael was an icon who changed music
     
  25. SITKOL'76

    SITKOL'76 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Colombia, SC
    Well a celebrity being a creep or of questionable moral character doesn't erase their talents. a lot of SHF's favorite musicians were downright psychopaths. I've read the biographies of artists like James Brown, John Lennon and Frank Sinatra and many of these men could be nightmares. Still, they occupy a significant and sacred place as far as American/Western popular culture is concerned.
     
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