Cleaning new vinyl?

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Positively Vinyl, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. marcb

    marcb Senior Member

    Location:
    DC area
    Always wet clean new records. Always. It doesn't matter where it was pressed or some other such variable. They're all dirty.

    A dry microfiber brush doesn't "clean" a record; it is only useful from removing residual dust debris from an already cleaned record.
     
    DrZhivago, nosliw, Tullman and 2 others like this.
  2. willboy

    willboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wales, UK
    I'm not criticising anyone who cleans their new vinyl if they think it necessary. All I'm saying is that I don't, at least not so far, which could be down to luck I suppose. No doubt much depends on how particular different pressing plants are regarding care and cleanliness, and European plants do appear to be better than US pressing plants in that respect, at least going by the number of US complaints I see on this forum.

    Also, I hear a lot about issues with non-fill, which is something I have yet to find on any of my new records. Another one I have yet to come across is mould release agent. Maybe it's on a couple of my records but I don't recognise it? Then again it's supposed to make a crackly type sound if present.

    I also buy used records and do clean them though only if they are visibly dirty, as many are, or are noisy when I play them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
  3. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Here in the U.S., plants like Rainbo and United have frequent problems with non-fill. Of the European plants, Optimal and MPO sometimes have issues with it as well, though perhaps not as frequently. I don't know what cartridge you are using but some cartridges are a lot less forgiving when it comes to pressing defects.

    Mold release is basically an old wives' tale at this point. Very few plants use any sort of thing and will straight up tell you that.
     
    nosliw and willboy like this.
  4. wgb113

    wgb113 Forum Resident

    Location:
    Chester County, PA
    I give them a quick(er) cleaning using:
    • TTVJ's Vinyl Zyme Cleaner concentrate diluted in one gallon of distilled water.
    • A MoFi brush.
    • Squeaky Clean Record Cleaning machine.
    • Distilled water rinse.
    I say quicker because I don't scrub as hard or let the solution "dwell" as long as I do on used records. I also use a different MoFi brush for used.

    I only clean my records this thoroughly once. I use an Audioquest carbon fiber brush before each play and brush the stylus off after each side.

    I would advise against using a dry microfiber - those things generate static!

    New records are dirty as others have mentioned judging by the water. Even when I had a SpinClean this was evident. I figure that A) it can't hurt to clean them, B) it should help my stylus last longer and C) make it sound better through less noise.
     
  5. Pavol Stromcek

    Pavol Stromcek Forum Resident

    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    Yeah, I've somehow managed to have very few encounters with non-fill (but many instances of other surface noise), but just recently I went through three copies of the 2018 This Mortal Coil It'll End in Tears reissue, which were plagued by non-fill, before finally finding a quiet copy. And this was pressed by MPO.
     
    patient_ot likes this.
  6. willboy

    willboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wales, UK
    I'm using a Hana EH, which does seem to be pretty forgiving with surface noise.

    It's no wonder I've never come across mould release agent..the darned stuff doesn't exist! :hide::) Thanks for enlightening me.
     
  7. ghost rider

    ghost rider Forum Resident

    Location:
    Chicago
    I clean everything new and old when it comes in my house. As has been said there is a lot a debris from the cutting heads that is left on the the record from time to time. The worst or best example depending on your perspective was the Beatles Mono Masters 3 disc set. The first time I played them there were so many pops and this is after scrubbing them in a SpinClean and vacuuming rinsing and vacuuming again with a Kab EV-1 RCM. I even had a thread about how disappointed I was and how much extra work the needle drops were .

    The second time I played them seemed like they were significantly more quiet like 80% better. I can only guess that the first time the needle plowed the groove and cleared all the junk out.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
    classicrocker likes this.
  8. canstoog

    canstoog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canada
    What’s that?
     
  9. eflatminor

    eflatminor Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kalifornia
    It's called a blaster, from a company called Giotto. Generally used in the film and photograph industry as well as various types of labs. Designed to blow off containment particles without touching the surface. The one pictured is their biggest (most air) and does a dandy job on vinyl. I much prefer it to dry brushing, which can dislodge dirt, only to embed it further down into the groove. I have two, one at the record cleaning station (I always start with the Giotto before the RCM) and one near the turntables for removing dust before putting the record back into a sleeve.

    I got mine through B&H Photo.
     
  10. John

    John Forum Resident

    Location:
    Northeast
    Speaking for myself, if I find the vinyl to be quiet enough and the sound is to my liking, I leave well enough alone.
     
    IR66, Fishoutofwater and eddiel like this.
  11. canstoog

    canstoog Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Canada
    Can I use this instead of a Milty Zerostat gun ?
     
  12. eflatminor

    eflatminor Forum Resident

    Location:
    Kalifornia
    No, but they work well in combination with one another. Stated differently, if the blaster isn't blowing off dust and other particles as readily as you'd like due to static, hit the record with the Zerostat and blast it again. You'll see the particles move more freely, hopefully off the surface of the record.

    One thing to keep in mind: The nozzle on the blaster is harder than vinyl. Be careful not to hit the record when blowing off the dust or you will leave a scratch...not likely deep enough to be heard, but still!
     
  13. carbonti

    carbonti Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    No worries. I did not take what you posted as any form of criticism and if I had given any impression that I was responding as if from being criticized then I apologize for the misunderstanding. We’re just a bunch of blokes talkin’ about records here.

    Each of us does what we wanna do to get the experience we want from this hobby. That is what I meant by bringing ones own value system to bear as I worded in my earlier post - I can’t not clean records because it would bug me that the sound might not be as good as it could be if I didn’t. With all the things I do in pursuit of this hobby, what’s one more quirk or habit to follow? In for a penny, in for a pound.

    Yeah sure, cleaning records sometimes seems like a chore. So I won’t clean as many and leave some for next time. If I have it on vinyl I probably have it on digital too so I won’t starve.
     
  14. waterclocker

    waterclocker Forum Resident

    Location:
    NW Indiana
    I'll only skip cleaning if it looks impeccably clean already and isn't charged with static. That's pretty rare though, so a wet clean is usually a must.
     
  15. willboy

    willboy Forum Resident

    Location:
    Wales, UK
    No problem whatsoever, and humble apologies on my part if I misunderstood your post. :)
     
  16. cyclistsb

    cyclistsb Forum Resident

    Clean them an put them in new plastic sleeves...never put them back into a paper sleeve after cleaning.
     
    waterclocker likes this.
  17. carbonti

    carbonti Forum Resident

    Location:
    NYC
    HaHa. Brings to mind the old quote, usually attributed to George Bernard Shaw that “Britain and America are two nations divided by a common language.”
     
    willboy likes this.
  18. Madness

    Madness "Hate is much too great a burden to bear."

    Location:
    Maryland, USA
    That's the bomb, yo.
     
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  19. IR66

    IR66 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    OREGON
    No.IMO NEW records don't, use a milty zerostat gun to remove any static,otherwise the new record will be noisy and presumed dirty when in all actuality it's static that's causing the clicks. Then carbon fiber brush lightly,do not press too hard because this will make more static.Lastly clean your stylus before every side because anything stuck to the stylus can cause noise as well.
    USED records that are dirty and full of fingerprints are in need of deep wet clean first before playing.Then do as above after that.
     
    willboy likes this.
  20. IR66

    IR66 Well-Known Member

    Location:
    OREGON
    I agree with you on the cleaning of 'New' vinyl. Static is what needs to be removed first with an anti static gun,and then a Dry carbon fiber brush to get the dust off,lightly used with no pressure.If this is not done before the playing of a New records
    then they may have ticks and pops caused by static and to the inexperienced presumed dirty when in all actuality it's Static.
    Used Dirty Vinyl on the other hand needs wet cleaning in a spin clean or other device and then after use the zerostat gun and carbon fiber brush only.
     
    willboy likes this.
  21. anonymous

    anonymous Active Member

    Location:
    NM
    Yes. I found when I upgraded my system to a high enough level I (and others) could easily discern the sound of the release agents that are sprayed on the record press and transferred to the record during pressing. This sound, kind of like sandpaper on plastic, disappears when the records are vacuum cleaned. It’s not heard on every record I have purchased new, but now I just clean them beforehand since I know they start out somewhat dirty.

    Explanation of how vinyl records are made/pressed - The Last Factory
     
  22. patient_ot

    patient_ot Forum Resident

    Location:
    USA
    Mold release agent is almost an old wive's tale or urban legend at this point. Many plants don't use it - people that run such plant have come on here and said so. Not to say you shouldn't clean new records, but that's not the reason you should be doing it, at least not with many new records.
     
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  23. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Sweden
    Beyond these companies that try to sell you cleaning products no other source ever reports mold release agents being sprayed on. Its a complete myth and no pressing plant walkthrough Ive seen every mentions this in the process. If its not needed now it wasnt needed before and only some really small plants could have used it if any.
     
  24. Tullman

    Tullman Senior Member

    Location:
    Boston MA
    I have found that cleaning new records is beneficial, as well. In fact, I think cleaning records before every play is beneficial, though I don't always do this.
     
    GyroSE likes this.
  25. Leonthepro

    Leonthepro Skeptically Optimistic Autodidact Debater

    Location:
    Sweden
    Every play? Geez luise.
     
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