Cleaning an AT6012 record cleaning brush

Discussion in 'Audio Hardware' started by Finkle, Sep 5, 2020.

  1. Finkle

    Finkle New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    New York
    Hi All,

    I have settled on a relatively simple and economical system for cleaning my fairly extensive - around 700 records - vinyl collection. I will use the spin clean to clean new or used records as I acquire them as well as working through my most played favourite older records. I have a lot of records that I play only very occasionally and maybe for just a track or two and that will likely never get the spin clean treatment. I will use the AT6012 and fluid for a quick pass before playing records and also use it for giving a quick cleaning of those only occasionally played records which have not had the spin clean treatment. I figure for those records I rarely play the AT6012 will suffice.

    My question is that debris, dirt, and other foreign matter must be transferred from the records to the AT6012 brush/pad eventually impregnating it and likely transferring it back onto records. Is there a recommended way to clean it so this does not happen? What do others that use this device do?

    Thanks so much!
    Gareth
     
  2. Agitater

    Agitater Forum Resident

    Location:
    Toronto
    Use a clean new, soft toothbrush every twenty sides or so (more if your LPs are generally already quite clean). Over the sink, use a mixture of one cup of distilled water and one drop of dishwashing liquid (Sunlight, Dawn, whatever you’ve got around). Don’t use more than a single drop. Dip the toothbrush then brush the AT6012 back and forth across its length for half a minute. Don’t scrub - use gentle pressure. Dump the dishwashing liquid solution, thoroughly rinse the toothbrush, then use another cup of distilled water in a clean mixing bowl to thoroughly rinse the AT6012. Repeat the rinse if necessary. You can use the clean toothbrush to help work in the rinse water if you like.

    Or . . . use a clean, soft toothbrush to gently scrub the AT6012 using a single drop of the dishwashing liquid on the brush while holding the AT6012 under running lukewarm water in your kitchen sink. Unless you’ve got seriously hard water, it should be fine.

    Either method works perfectly well. The first one takes three or four minutes. The second method takes a minute of two.

    In both cases, use the clean smooth plastic handle of the toothbrush to help squeeze excess water out of the AT6012 when you’re done.
     
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  3. Finkle

    Finkle New Member Thread Starter

    Location:
    New York
    Thanks so much. This is very helpful. I did not know if you could clean the brush without damaging it.
     
  4. JohnO

    JohnO Forum Resident

    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Heck, I just brush the 6012 brush with the toothbrush, when both are dry. I suppose sometime I may want to wet clean the 6012 brush, but I have never felt the need to so far.
     
  5. Phil Thien

    Phil Thien Forum Resident

    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    I use an AT-6012 extensively. I use uncut alcohol with mine, so it evaporates from the pad after I've played a side.

    Between uses, I brush the AT-6012 with a small cleaning brush. It is the brush that came w/ a different cleaning pad. Sort of like the little red Discwasher brush, but wider. I brush the fabric with the grain, like you'd pet a dog or cat.

    I will occasionally run the pad under the tap, wiping the pad with my finer as the water runs over it. I shake the pad out and then use a paper tower to wick most of the moisture from the pad, and then allow the cleaned pad to dry overnight.
     
  6. LakeMountain

    LakeMountain Vinyl surfer

    Location:
    Netherlands
    I am using mine with and without uncut IPA. After each dry or wet clean I brush the pad several times over the light blue rim of the brush holder. It seems to remove any visible dirt on the pad.
     
  7. Joel Shapiro

    Joel Shapiro Forum Resident

    For new records, is the AT6012 all that's required to clean records? I'm questioning the necessity of spending $$$ on an RCM just for new records.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2020
  8. LakeMountain

    LakeMountain Vinyl surfer

    Location:
    Netherlands
    Nowadays new records are not cleaned (properly) after pressing, which can result in an oily substance, which is there to separate easily from the lacquer. This can remain as residue. A dose of IPA on the 6012 should help here as well. I am not using a RCM and I get them clean as well.
     
  9. Joel Shapiro

    Joel Shapiro Forum Resident

    I found that grease you're talking about on my brand new Beatles mono Please Please Me LP. I still haven't been able to get it off, but I don't have a 6012 or RCM at the moment. Are you saying the 6012 gets that junk off?
     
  10. Phil Thien

    Phil Thien Forum Resident

    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    Get two of these:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01J6D49BW

    Apply alcohol to one, keep the other dry. Rotate the wet (alcohol) one five times, then use the dry one for one rotation.

    I use these with the lazy susan table I made, so I can apply a little more pressure w/o stalling the platter or worrying about my table's bearing.

    While I still like the 6012 for on-turntable cleaning, I think for off-table cleaning these cheap velvet pads work even better.
     
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  11. LakeMountain

    LakeMountain Vinyl surfer

    Location:
    Netherlands
    Yes, sorry I used an acronym, IPA (isopropyl alcohol). I use 99,9% pure alcohol, but you can thin it down with distilled water, if you like. As Phil says you apply it on the 6012. I then wipe with a microfiber cloth for fast drying, but pure IPA evaporate without residue very fast. Be careful pure IPA is extremely flammable.

    I have a record clamp, which makes cleaning and wiping easier.
     
    Joel Shapiro likes this.
  12. Joel Shapiro

    Joel Shapiro Forum Resident

    I tried a 50/50 IPA:water mix on a microfiber magic towel and it didn't lift off the grease. Are you saying a Sonic Broom works better at digging out the dirt from record grooves than a cloth does?
     
  13. LakeMountain

    LakeMountain Vinyl surfer

    Location:
    Netherlands
    When I got very old greasy records, I put a fair measure of pure IPA on a microfiber cloth and worked it by applying some pressure on a firm surface and a towel as support around the grooves for a minute. You can rinse then with destillier water, but if it grease is the problem you can omit it.

    I then repeated the treatment with IPA on the record player, applying almost no pressure. This ensures that velvet fibers of the pad reach deep into grooves and remove any remaining loosened grease.

    This is my heavy duty method, I hope it works for you.
     
    Joel Shapiro likes this.

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